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Advocacy

The medical home may act as an advocate in many different roles. The most common type of advocacy will be one-on-one with a family helping them obtain needed services or funding for their child. The most common advocacy activities the medical home may perform are writing letters of medical necessity and helping families appeal funding denials.

Writing Letters of Medical Necessity: See Request for a Letter of Medical Necessity Form (Portal) (Word Document 27 KB), A Request for a Letter of Medical Necessity (PDF Document 33 KB), Medical Home Newsletter, Volume I, Issue I (PDF Document 71 KB), and Appealing Funding Denials.

Working With the Larger System: The medical home will be most effective if they understand other systems (e.g., public school, Medicaid, private insurers, and state agencies). See Resources below for state-specific organizations.

Impacting the Community: The medical home may choose to take on advocacy roles through outreach, education, or legislative lobbying. [O'Brien: 1997].

Resources

Information & Support

For Professionals

Medicaid
Official U.S. government site for Medicaid services.

Services for Patients & Families in Montana (MT)

For services not listed above, browse our Services categories or search our database.

* number of provider listings may vary by how states categorize services, whether providers are listed by organization or individual, how services are organized in the state, and other factors; Nationwide (NW) providers are generally limited to web-based services, provider locator services, and organizations that serve children from across the nation.

Helpful Articles

O'Brien S, Parker S, Greenberg J, Zuckerman B.
Putting children first: the pediatrician as advocate.
Contemporary Pediatrics. 1997:103-118.
Defines the process of advocating for health care funding and gives specific examples of effective and ineffective letters for Medicaid funding. It also gives information on how to become active in community advocacy and the legislative process.

Authors & Reviewers

Initial publication: September 2008; last update/revision: May 2011
Current Authors and Reviewers:

Page Bibliography

O'Brien S, Parker S, Greenberg J, Zuckerman B.
Putting children first: the pediatrician as advocate.
Contemporary Pediatrics. 1997:103-118.
Defines the process of advocating for health care funding and gives specific examples of effective and ineffective letters for Medicaid funding. It also gives information on how to become active in community advocacy and the legislative process.